• Woodbridge Township School District

     AP Music Theory Syllabus

     

     

    Course Planner: (Note: Main chapter references are from the “Tonal Harmony” textbook.  Chapter references for singing are from “Music for Sight Singing” text.)   This schedule is approximate, as classes may move slower or faster from one year to another. Written homework and reading assignments are given at each class period.

     

    First Marking Period, Part 1 (4 weeks)

    Week 1 Review 

    (Teacher may assign a pre-test or worksheet encompassing the first 4 chapters to be completed before the first day of class.)

     

    Chapter 1 – Elements of Pitch - Keyboard and octave registers; notation of the staff; major scale; major key signatures; minor scales; minor key signatures; scale degree names; intervals; perfect, major, and minor intervals; augmented and diminished intervals; inversion of intervals; consonant and dissonant intervals.

    Ear Training: Intervals, triads, and scales

    Sight Singing: Rhythm – “Music For Sight Singing”, Chapter2

    Chapter 2 – Elements of Rhythm – Rhythm; durational symbols; beat and tempo; meter; division of the beat; simple time signatures; compound time signatures.

    Ear Training: Intervals, triads, and scales

    Sight Singing: Rhythm - Simple meters; the beat and its division into two parts, Chapter 1

    Chapter 3 – Introduction to Triads and Seventh Chords – Triads; Seventh Chords, Inversions of Chords; Inversion Symbols and Figured Bass; Lead Sheet Symbols; Recognizing Chords in Various Textures.

    Ear Training: Rhythmic Dictation- Simple meters, seconds, thirds, and fourths.

    Sight Singing: Melody- stepwise melodies, major keys; Chapter 3

    Rhythm- simple meters; the beat and its division into two parts.

    Chapter 4 – Diatonic Chords in Major and Minor Keys – Minor scale; diatonic

     triads in major; diatonic triads in minor; diatonic seventh chords in major; diatonic seventh chords in minor. 2

    Ear Training: Melodic Dictation- fifths, sixths, and octaves; Harmonic dictation- four part settings of the tonic triad.

    Sight Singing: Melody- Intervals from the tonic triad, major keys, Chapter 3 continued;

    Rhythm - simple meters.

     

    Week 2

    Chapter 5 – Principles of Voice Leading– the melodic line; notating chords, voicing a single triad; parallel motion.

    Ear Training: Rhythmic dictation- beat subdivision by 2; Melodic dictation- the tonic triad and dominant seventh; Harmonic dictation- the tonic triad and dominant seventh.

    Sight Singing: Melody- intervals from the tonic triad, major keys;

    Rhythm- compound meters; the beat and its division into three parts.

     

    Week 3

    Chapter 6 – Root Position Part Writing – Root position part writing with repeated roots; root position part writing with roots a 4th (5th) apart; root position part writing with roots a 3rd (6th) apart; root position part writing with roots a 2nd (7th) apart; instrumental ranges and transpositions.

    Ear Training: Rhythmic dictation - beat subdivision by 4, anacrusis; Melodic dictation - primary triads and the dominant seventh; Harmonic dictation - primary triads and the dominant seventh, cadential tonic six-four.

    Sight Singing: Melody - minor keys, intervals from the tonic triad, Chapter 5

    Rhythm - simple and compound meters.

     

    Week 4

    Chapter 7 – Harmonic Progression – Sequences and the circle of fifths; the I and V chords; the II chord; the VI chord; the III chord; the VII chord; the IV chord; common exceptions; differences in the minor mode; progressions involving seventh chords, harmonizing a simple melody.

    Ear Training: Rhythmic dictation - dots and ties; Melodic dictation - minor mode; Harmonic dictation - minor mode, first inversion of triads.

    Sight Singing: Melody - intervals from the dominant (V) triad, major and minor keys, Chapter 6

    Rhythm - simple and compound meters.

    First Marking Period, Part 2 (5 weeks)

     

    Week 1

    Chapter 8 – Triads in First Inversion – bass arpeggiation; substituted first inversion triads; parallel sixth chords; part writing first inversion triads; soprano-bass counterpoint.

    Ear Training: Melodic dictation - the supertonic triad; Harmonic dictation - the supertonic triad, inversions of V7.

    Sight Singing: The C Clefs - alto and tenor clefs, Chapter 7

    Week 2

    Chapter 9 – Triads in Second Inversion – bass arpeggiation and the melodic bass; the cadential six-four; the passing six-four; the pedal six-four; part-writing for second inversion triads.

    Ear Training: Rhythmic dictation - compound meter; Melodic dictation - all diatonic triads; Harmonic dictation - all diatonic triads.

    Sight Singing: Melody - further use of diatonic intervals, Chapter 8

    Rhythm - simple and compound meters.

    Week 3

    Chapter 10 – Cadences, Phrases, and Periods – Musical form; cadences; cadences and harmonic rhythm, motives and phrases; period forms.

    Ear Training: Rhythmic dictation - triplets; Melodic dictation - supertonic and leading tone sevenths; Harmonic dictation - supertonic and leading tone sevenths.

    Sight Singing: Melody - intervals from the dominant seventh chord (V7), other diatonic intervals of the seventh; Rhythm - simple and compound meters.

    Week 4

    Chapter 11 – Non-Chord Tones 1 – Classification of Non-Chord Tones; passing tones; neighboring tones; suspensions and retardations; figured bass and lead sheet symbols; embellishing a simple texture.

    Ear Training: Examples from music literature.

    Sight Singing: Rhythm - subdivision of beat, simple beat into four parts, compound beat into six parts.  

    Chapter 12 – Non-Chord Tones 2 – Appoggiaturas; escape tones; the neighbor group; anticipations; the pedal point; special problems in the analysis of non-chord tones.

    Ear Training: Rhythmic dictation - syncopation; Melodic dictation - non-dominant seventh chords; Harmonic dictation - non-dominant seventh chords.

    Sight Singing: Melody - intervals from the tonic and dominant triads; Rhythm - subdivision in simple and compound meters.

    Week 5

    Review Chapters 1 through 9

    Semester One Exam

     

    Second Marking Period, Part 1 (Four Weeks)

     

    Week 1

    Chapter 13 – The V7 Chord – General voice-leading considerations; the V7 in root position; the V7 in three parts; other resolutions of the V7; the inverted V7 chord; the V6/5 Chord; the V4/3 Chord; the V4/2 Chord; the approach to the 7th.

    Ear Training: Melodic dictation - scalar variants, modal borrowing, and decorative chromaticism; Harmonic dictation - scalar variants, modal borrowing.

    Sight Singing: Melody - further use of diatonic intervals; Rhythm - subdivision in simple and compound meters.

    Week 2

    Chapter 14 – The II7 and VII7 Chords – The II7 chord; the VII7 chord in Major; the VII7 chord in Minor.

    Ear Training: Melodic and Harmonic dictation - secondary dominants.

    Sight Singing: Melody - chromaticism (I) - chromatic nonharmonic tones, the dominant of the dominant (V/V) harmony, modulation to the key of the dominant.

    Chapter 15 – Other Diatonic Seventh Chords – The IV7 chord; the VI7 chord; the I7 chord; the III7 chord; seventh chords and the Circle-of-Fifths progression.

    Ear Training: Examples from music literature.

    Sight Singing: Melody - chromaticism (II) - modulation to closely related keys, additional secondary dominant harmonies.

    Week 3

    Chapter 16 and 17 – Secondary Functions 1 and 2 – Chromaticism and altered chords; secondary functions; secondary dominant chords; spelling secondary dominants; recognizing secondary dominants; secondary dominants in context; secondary leading tone chords; spelling secondary leading-tone chords; recognizing secondary leading-tone chords; sequences involving secondary functions; deceptive resolutions of secondary functions.

    Ear Training: Melodic and Harmonic dictation - modulation to closely related keys

    Sight Singing: Rhythm and Melody - syncopation

    Week 4

    Chapter 18 and 19 – Modulations using diatonic common chords – modulation and change of key; modulation and tonicization; key relationships; common-chord modulation; analyzing common-chord modulation; altered chords as common chords; sequential modulation; modulation by common tone; monophonic modulation; direct modulation.

    Ear Training: Rhythmic dictation - quintuple meter; Melodic dictation - the neapolitan sixth chord augmented sixth chords, and modulation to distantly related keys; Harmonic dictation - the neapolitan sixth chord, augmented sixth chords, enharmonic modulation.

    Sight Singing: Rhythm and Melody - triplet division of undotted note values, duplet division of dotted note values.

    Second Marking Period, Part 2 (4 Weeks)

    Week 1

    Chapter 20 – Binary and Ternary Forms – Formal terminology; binary forms; ternary forms; rounded binary forms; 12-bar blues; other formal designs.

    Ear Training: Examples from music literature.

    Sight Singing: Rhythm and Melody - changing meter signatures: the Hemiola; less common meter signatures.

    Week 2

    Chapters 21 and 22 – Mode Mixture and the Neapolitan Chord – Borrowed chords in minor; the use of b6 in Major; modulations involving mode mixture; the Neapolitan chord.

    Ear Training: Rhythmic dictation - irregular meters; Melodic and Harmonic dictation - diatonic modes.

    Sight Singing: Rhythm and Melody - further subdivision of the beat; notation in slow tempi.

    Week 3

    Chapters 23 and 24 – Augmented Sixth Chords – The interval of the augmented 6th; the Italian augmented 6th chord; the French augmented 6th; the German augmented 6th; resolutions to other scale degrees and other chord members.

    Ear Training: Rhythmic dictation - changing meters; Part music dictation

    Sight Singing: Chromaticism (III) - additional uses of chromatic tones

    Week 4

    Chapter 28 – An Introduction to Twentieth-Century Music – Impressionism; scales; the diatonic church modes; pentatonic scales; synthetic scales; tertian harmony and lead sheet symbols; quartal and secundal harmony; parallelism; pandiatonicism; atonal theory; the 12-tone serialism; total serialism. Aleatory or chance music.

    Ear Training: Rhythmic dictation - changing meters; Part music dictation - pandiatonicism.

    Sight Singing: Chromaticism (III) - additional uses of chromatic tones, remote modulation.

     

    Remaining Weeks

    Review for AP Music Theory Exam

    Take practice free-response questions

    Take AP Music Theory Exam

    Semester Two Exam

     

    Textbooks: -Kostka, Stefan, and Dorothy Payne. 2004. Tonal Harmony: With an Introduction to Twentieth-Century-Music, Fifth Edition. New York: McGraw-Hill. With CD

     -Ottman, Robert W. and Rogers, Nancy. 2007. Music for Sight Singing. Pearson Prentice Hall.

    - Ottman, Robert W. 1997. Elementary Harmony Theory and Practice, Second Edition. Prentice-Hall, Inc.

    Workbooks: -Kostka, Stefan, and Dorothy Payne. 2004. Tonal Harmony: With an Introduction to Twentieth-Century-Music, Fifth Edition. New York: McGraw-Hill. With CD

    -Scoggin, Nancy - Barrons AP Music Theory Book.  Barron's Educational Series 2010.

     

                Teacher Resources:

    Ottman, Robert W. 1972. Advanced Harmony Theory and Practice, Second Edition. Prentice-Hall, Inc.

    - Elementary Harmony: Theory and Practice with CD, 5th Edition, Ottman
    -Advanced Harmony: Theory and Practice with CD, 5th Edition, Ottman

    -The Practice of Harmony, 6th Edition, 2012, Spencer
     -Fundamentals of Music: Rudiments, Musicianship, and Composition, 6th Edition, 2013, Henry
    -Basic Materials in Music Theory, 12th Edition, 2010, Harder & Steinke

    -www.musictheory.net

    -College Board AP Music Theory home

    http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/teachers_corner/2261.html

     

     

    Computer programs: Sibelius 7, Band In a Box

     

    Materials needed:

    Each student will be required to have the following materials daily:

    1.      Music manuscript notebook

    2.      Pencils DO NOT USE INK IN THIS CLASS!! Assignments written in ink will be returned ungraded.

    3.      A folder for notes and handouts.

    4.      Texts and workbooks from above.

    5.      Sibelius 7, Band In a Box computer programs

    6.      Keyboard, headphones, microphone.

     

    Student Evaluation:

    Tests/Major Assessments 75%

    Homework/Quizzes/Minor Assessments 25%

     

     

     

    Objectives:

    At the end of the course, students will be able to:

    a.)    Notate pitch and rhythm in accordance with standard notation practices.

    b.)    Read and write in treble, bass, and movable C clefs.

    c.)    Write, sing, and play major scales and all three forms of minor scales.

    d.)    Recognize by ear and by sight all intervals within an octave.

    e.)    Use the basic rules that govern music composition.

    f.)     Harmonize a melody with appropriate chords using good voice leading.

    g.)    Analyze the chords of a musical composition by number and letter name.

    h.)   Transpose a composition from one key to another.

    i.)     Express musical ideas by composing and arranging.

    j.)     Understand and recognize basic musical forms: ternary, binary, rondo, etc.

    k.)    Write simple rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic dictation.

     

    Teaching Strategies/Student Activities:

    Written Work:  Students are expected to participate actively in classroom discussions and demonstrations each day.  The teacher will collect and grade all written work from the texts and workbooks.  A comprehensive theory folder containing all handouts as well as homework, quizzes, and exams that are returned is required.  The “Tonal Harmony” workbook includes extensive partwriting and composition exercises which will be assigned every day.  Students will complete at least one written test per week.  Competency with technology is a major component of this course.  Students will input melodies and compositions into Sibelius and Band In a Box software.  Aside from printing these assignments out, students will also playback the assignments as critique.  Students will also use online sources such as musictheory.net. 

    Aural Work:  Students will also demonstrate mastery of Solfege singing by completing assignments from “Music For Sight-Singing”.  Students will demonstrate knowledge by singing alone and with others as well as by utilizing the microphone to record progress and singing tests.  Students will also be required to take rhythmic and melodic dictation.  There will be at least one aural dictation or sight-singing test per week.

    Projects:  In addition to daily assignments, written tests, and aural tests, there will be at least one major project per semester such as short compositions and written reports.  For a final project, the students will create an original composition in 4-parts utilizing all of the techniques learned in class and transpose for four unique instruments.  Students will perform, record, and critique this composition.

     

    Class Expectations:

    1.      Respect yourself, teachers, other students, your parents, your school and your administration. Respecting yourself and the people around you will make your experience more enjoyable and fulfilling, and the people around you interact with will respond to you in a positive manner.

    2.      Be on time. We stay very busy in this class – we have a lot to do everyday and each minute counts!! The school wide tardy policy is very clear and we will follow this policy in this class.

    3.      Turn assignments in on time. Late assignments make things difficult since we move so quickly.  There will occasionally be a legitimate reason why an assignment will be turned in late (for example, an excused absence). Students will be allowed 1 day per excused absence to make up work.

     

    4.      Take care of personal business during the passing period to avoid disrupting class. Passes to leave class will be very limited.  Begin early to budget your time and breaks.